16 Comments
Dec 10, 2023·edited Dec 10, 2023

I used to listen to CBC radio a few hours every day. I rarely tune in now because of their woke ideological bent. It's impossible to hear a serious discussion of gender/sex related issues or about racism. The point of view is fixed and certain basic questions are not and cannot be asked. This ideological bias leads me away from all of its programming, much of which is like what it has always been. The lack of intellectual honesty and honest reporting has driven me into the arms of people like Tara, and I think many have made the same choice. Theoretically, I would like the CBC to thrive but right now I don't care if it does. This groupthink virus affects media like the Star and Globe as well, and newer ventures like the National Observer, all of which I used to subscribe to.

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From the government of Canada perspective, the unwritten danger of the subscriber model is that they lose the countrywide propaganda machine that is the legacy press and the CBC. How do you define and shape the narrative in that environment? The US can use AI and censorship through their in-house social media companies, but poor little Canada is left out in the cold. If I was in their shoes, I'd be desperately trying to hang on to my messaging apparatus.

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I came away from my read of today’s dialogue between AC and TH with one outstanding takeaway….you are both delusional about the CBC!

Your comment AC…”  I don’t think it means that because newspapers are getting funding from the government, they are going to automatically turn around and endorse everything Justin Trudeau does. I don’t think it’s as ham-fisted as that”.

Then why can’t we read a truthfully written report on just about anything? I use the Truckers Convoy as an example. What CBC reported was full of enormous lies and untruths. Were these reporters blind? Pleasing whom??

Your comment TH…..“ How do we make sure that the public that cannot afford subscriptions is informed on what’s going on in our country? And how do we maintain a shared set of facts”?

I, and every last one of my friends, used to be ardent readers and watchers of all things CBC. However, the entire COVID farce opened all eyes to the dishonesty and government propaganda CBC was spewing to put fear into the Canadian public. Many people have died or disabled as a result. EpochTimes is reader funded, gutsy honest 100% of the time and appears to be doing extremely well financially. So no worries about us ‘poor people’ knowing what’s truthfully going on in our country.

In closing, my thoughts on “bonuses”…..on top of those already receiving a healthy salary. Many of us today can’t afford life’s essentials. We do without proper healthy food and other essentials just to try and pay our bills. Those of us with an income are grateful. Hearing that this misguided Tait is giving thought to receiving a bonus…..a bonus for what? It’s beyond disgusting!!

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(from the interview) " “The CBC has written nasty things about us, so let’s punish them.”

Do you believe the CPC is as bald-faced as that? Or are they also trying to fix the bias that you, yourself, see as a problem? It can be said that, regardless of the political point of view, everyone sees the same problems with shades of difference in the solutions. The Left has traditionally looked to the benevolent State to respond, and the Right would rather see it arise from the people. Now that the Left has been overtaken by a strange worldview called “Progressivism” (indeed an irrational suite of ideas), what are we to do? We need the Legacy Left to just say “NO!” to this madness of regressive Progressivism and give us an alternative from which we, the people, can seek a balance.

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So the Canadian media has become parasitic welfare recipients, and the bill that was passed is their affirmative action plan, with Google giving them some free cheese. Oh, now I get it.

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As Andrew Coyne points out the “save me big daddy government” attitude is rampant in Canadian society (businesses and people) from the media to gender ideology to the fossil fuels industry. Adaptability and resilience are too rare in Canada.

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AC's was slapdash commentary. Little depth, nuance nor insight. Demand more of him, Tara. He can do better.

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Virtually Unreadable Coyne gets every single thing wrong. "You could get away with a lot of stuff, back in the day." Completely ridiculous. Reporters used to be real journalists who actually did research and asked hard questions and had opinions people cared about. Not now. Definitely not Coyne.

People should be paid for producing content. Of course. We used to have an effective copyright regime that did that. Liberals gutted that. It really does not matter where the money comes from: if someone is making money on the data flow, fine, PayMeZuk.

CBC is finished and needs to be put out of our misery. Dead horse. Flogging. Very distasteful.

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This passage is all kinds of wrong: “When the content is just something to put between the ads, there’s a lot less importance attached to it. You could get away with a lot of stuff, back in the day, that you really couldn’t get away with now. With a more reader-financed model, you have to make it worth their while. You have to produce a quality product. You have to justify their expense … A paying audience turns out to be a very demanding and discerning audience.”

I say again: This is completely false. A model funded primarily by subscriptions simply creates a parallel and likely more dangerous set of perverse incentives. A publication that’s afraid to offend its advertisers has blind spots. A publication that’s afraid to offend its readers is blind.

Look at the New York Times, which has been actively transitioning to a subscription model for years--and more than ever just feeds its readers partisan, ideological chum instead of telling them the truth.

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I used to listen to CBC radio and watch local news daily. In recent years the CBC has morphed into a propaganda mill which tries to divide Canadians from one another and make us feel bad about ourselves. As a result I no longer view or listen to the CBC . However, I was curious so I did watch CBC president Catherine Tait being interviewed on the National this week by Adrienne Arsenault about bonuses for executives. Honestly, it reminded me of the Hunger Games. Canadians, including CBC staff who have been laid off, are fighting it out for food, warmth and shelter. Not CBC executives though, they are watching from above and they are entertained, but not impacted, by our plight.

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